Explaining Boston

Explain Boston to your kids or your grandkids.  There are some things that just don’t make sense.  I was so proud of Ed McIntosh who was on the air at KGHL Monday afternoon.  Ed worked hard to get phone calls to Billings residents (like James Berve and Rocky coach Alan King) who ran in the marathon. He didn’t just write a story–he got them on the air to find out what happened and were they OK.  KGHL was online yes, but on air is where Ed and KGHL really shined.  I am proud to be at a place that does local radio and does it right.

How strongly do your employees believe in what they are selling?

It was a question that immediately set my mind to racing this morning when I heard it.  You’ve been around people who didn’t believe.  You know, the kind of employee who mumbles when you ask a question.  Or doesn’t follow up your request with a coherent answer.  It’s a great question to ask yourself in your business this morning.

Mark May 23rd on your calendar right NOW!  Its the KGHL 85th anniversary party at our studios at 600 First Avenue North.  Last year we had a blast talking about the history of Billings oldest continuously operating commercial radio station.  This year, we’re gonna party like its a few years past 1999. You’ll get an invitation for the event soon.

KGHL just completed the biggest audience research project I’ve ever been part of launching.  Over 1700 KGHL listeners had a chance to tell us what they thought, what they do, and what they like and don’t like about the Mighty 790.  The results were stunning.  I think it will change the way you look at KGHL.

This week in Mighty Marketing, the only way social media works, an infographic on social media use, the scariest part of being a print advertiser today, Google dumps another product, and the top line data on our innovative market study.

I hope you find this week’s issue useful.  Each week, I skim and review a ton of marketing ideas and blogs so you don’t have to spend your time. Thanks for reading.

Ray Massie  General Manager KGHL  406-850-4659  406-252-6661

Ray Massie, General Manager KGHL

Attention, Interest, Desire, Actionby USA TodayFinally, an example of how social media can actually grab attention.Sophomoric? Silly? Or a smart strategic move?

Ship My PantsThe jury is out on a new Kmart ad that uses sleight of mouth to promote a free shipping service. The online video shows customers who exclaim that they are going to “ship their pants” through a Kmart delivery program — but it sounds as if they are using a vulgar word that sounds very much like ship.

Some social media users deemed the commercial, created by ad agency Draftfcb Chicago, “gross” and “vulgar,” while many gave kudos to Kmart for having an edgy sense of humor.

But even with the negative comments, Kmart got what it wanted: Millions of potential shoppers now know that it offers free shipping for members of its “Shop Your Way” program when the product they want isn’t in the store.

News networks such as CNN’s HLN reported on the controversial ad, while the official YouTube video from Kmart had nearly 10 million views as of late Tuesday afternoon.

OK, its not the first time social media stuff made an impact.  The biggest single problem with social media is its general lack of ability to get Attention.  Using digital products like Adwords, Facebook, etc, are great once you have grabbed a consumers attention.

All of us wish we could do viral work like this.  Remember, the God Made A Farmer video from Ram Trucks that spawned a 100 or more mimics online.  Note the part traditional media played in bringing the controversy to the masses.

If it doesn’t get attention, it doesn’t matter.



This is the Scariest Statistic About the Newspaper Business Today
by Derek Thompson

Scary newspaper wasteHere it is: In 2012, newspapers lost $16 in print ads for every $1 earned in digital ads. And it’s getting worse, according to a new report by Pew. In 2011, the ratio was just 10-to-1.

The digital ad revolution, always “just around the corner”, remains tantalizingly out of reach for most newspapers, which explains why some stalwarts like the New York Times and Wall Street Journal have moved to subscription models for their websites to bolster digital ad growth. Just today, the Washington Post announced a paywall.

Here’s the ten year picture of print vs. digital ads for newspapers:

Since 2003, print ads have fallen from $45 billion to $19 billion. Online ads have only grown from $1.2 to $3.3 billion. Stop and think about that gap. The total ten-year increase in digital advertising isn’t even enough to overcome the average single-year decline in print ads since 2003. Ugh.

Google Shuts Down Its Google Affiliate NetworkGoogle logoGoogle constantly is tinker with and making changes in its company.  If you were a user of the RSS feed reader, Google Reader, the company announced its shut down earlier in the month.  Additionally, Google announced this week it will shut down the Google Affiliate Network. Google pledged to continue to support customers as the network winds down “over the next few months.”The closing was announced by J.J. Hirschle, head of Google Affiliate Network, on its official blog.  Hirschle said the program originally was created to help advertisers drive conversions (sales) via cost-per-action advertising.  He said Google re-evaluated the service in light of recent developments in the marketplace.“We’re constantly evaluating our products to ensure that we’re focused on the services that will have the biggest impact for our advertisers and publishers,” Hirschle wrote. “To that end, we’ve made the difficult decision to retire Google Affiliate Network and focus on other products that are driving great results for clients.”


The Biggest Radio Research Project Ever Done in Billings

Unlike virtually every single “research” project ever done for the Billings market, KGHL wanted to focus on the listeners and what they do and use.  You can find agencies and reps who will quote “the numbers” without much understanding what those numbers mean.  I have never seen a ‘number'” buy anything.

This was a consumer study of more than 1700 members of the KGHL audience.  The compares with the current market rating service which surveys 1200 PER YEAR. If you have ever put credibility in ratings, the KGHL study group was nearly 50% higher and responded in a four day time span.  Its a real accurate picture of the audience who listens to KGHL.

Highlights from the results:

32% of the KGHL listener group works in Agriculture.  That’s a huge number and probably not found anywhere else unless you look at the MATE Show for example.  The second highest work group was construction.

50% of KGHL’s audience is 45-64.  That is right on par with the Billings market.

Only 21% of KGHL’s audience uses Optimum cable.  You certainly can’t reach the KGHL person by using cable TV advertising.  Print isn’t any higher.  31% of the KGHL group subscribes to the Gazette.

Couple of more interesting items from the study, Twitter use is non existent (2%)Facebook use is at (47%). Men listen to KGHL much more than women (58/42).

There’s more to the study to share.  The idea here was to have a real complete view of our audience so we can do a better job of helping you with your business.  KGHL is not the product for every business.  But we know better than anyone who we reach, what they think, and the products they need from you.


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