What Are You Doing With Your Time?

Take a moment today and reflect on how fleeting our time can be.Greg Chirrick passed away last evening.  If you didn’t know Greg, you certainly passed his businesses every day.  Greg was very involved in our community. He coached at his son’s baseball games and one of the local all star teams.  I understand he may have been at a game last night. My prayers for the family as they try and make some sense of this.  His co-workers and employees at Taco John’s of the area have lost a great leader and man.After writing the paragraph about Greg, it is hard to write the rest of the content today.

There are countless stories from Boston this week about people who were saved through the heroic efforts of others.  Stories of how people suffered horrific injuries and are persevering.  Those are just words or images on TV.  Reality is what happens close to home.  Reality hit with a vicious punch last night.

May 23 is the date of the KGHL Anniversary Party

Mark May 23rd on your calendar right NOW!  Its the KGHL 85th anniversary party at our studios at 600 First Avenue North.  Last year we had a blast talking about the history of Billings oldest continuously operating commercial radio station.  This year, we’re gonna party like its a few years past 1999. Formal invitations along with countless e-mails cluttering your inbox are coming soon.

Do you remember when producers of the movie, Nebraska, came to shoot a few scenes in Billings last fall?  I was sitting in Don Luis Mexican Restaurant when the snow put an end to their shooting for the day.  The cool part?  I got a call from the show’s producers this week.  Apparently, they want a little authentic Montana radio audio for use in the show.  Their only call (at least they told me) was to Montana’s Mighty 790.  When the movie comes out, you may hear KGHL blaring in the background of a scene or two. If we stay off the cutting room floor.

This week in Mighty Marketing, SMB owners struggling with social media, a Fool dumps on cable companies (not the product, the companies), ancient advertising wisdom, the greatest thing ever written, and a definitive reason why Duck Dynasty works and how you can benefit.

61% of Small Business Owners See NO RETURN in Social Mediaby Anita Campbell, Small Business TrendsThirty-nine percent (39%) of small business owners are seeing a return on investment from social media.  That is according to a recent survey by Manta, released just last week.

Manta, an online small business community, surveyed more than 1,200 of its members to generate its quarterly Small Business Wellness Index, where these findings are from.

If 61% of small business owners aren’t seeing a return on their investment, why do so many agencies continue to pound the drum and promote social media and “counting the likes?”


Threats to Cable Getting More Real By The Day

The KGHL listener research study of more than 1700 people showed use of cable by our listeners was very low–only 21% were Optimum subscribers.  Now comes a presentation by the Motley Fool that really shows the challenges for cable.  The following showed up in my inbox this week.

Click on the photo to watch the presentation

Cable challenges from Motley Fool

Cable Challenges from Motley Fool


Ancient Advertising Wisdom
by Roy H. Williams, The Wizard of Ads

Ancient Ad WisdomI’ve never seen a business fail due to “reaching the wrong people.” So why does every business owner instinctively believe that “reaching the right people” is the key to successful advertising?

Who, exactly, do you not want to know about you? Who isn’t qualified to repeat the good things they’ve heard about you? And when is the best time to advertise?

Solomon wrote about these things in the 11th chapter of Ecclesiastes:

“If you wait for perfect weather, you will never plant your seeds. If you are afraid that every cloud will bring rain, you will never harvest your crops… So begin planting early in the morning, and don’t stop working until evening. You don’t know what might make you rich. Maybe everything you do will be successful.”

Advertising is a seed that grows in the soil of the customer’s heart. If you will allow this metaphor, it would appear that Solomon advises, “Don’t overthink it. Just tell your story every day in every circumstance. You never know who might be listening.”

I know it’s counterintuitive, but if you look at all the offers from all the sellers of mass media and then accept the offer that allows you to reach the largest number of people each week, 52 weeks a year, for the fewest dollars per week, it’s hard to make a mistake.

An impressive, memorable message is what matters most. How you deliver that message – and who hears it – is far less important than you have been led to believe.

It is your choice of message that targets the customer, not your choice of media.

How to Conquer the World (in Only One Page!)

I just read an article in a professional publication that promised “How to Build a Marketing Empire.”  Hyperbole

It was eight paragraphs long.

If there were truth in titling, the writer of this article would be doing life in prison.

You can get a good idea or two in eight paragraphs. You can expand you knowledge in that much space.

What you can’t do is learn anything substantive enough to help you build a tiny hut much less an empire.

Customers, readers, followers and most people in general are tired of hyperbole and exaggeration. You have to be clever to get attention, but don’t stoop to arousing needs you can’t fulfill.

It goes back to the familiar but often unpracticed adage: Say what you’ll do and do what you’ll say.

Even if you only have eight paragraphs to do it.


Jase Robertson of Duck Dynasty Coming to Billings

Jase and Missy Robertson of Duck DynastyJase and Missy Robertson are coming to Metra Park in a fund raiser for the Big Sky Youth Education Foundation May 4.  I hope you have your tickets or table.  There are a lot of reasons why this show works.

I thought I’d let the Salt Lake Tribune explain why the show is so popular.

With their long, bushy beards, the camouflage-wearing, self-described “rednecks” of “Duck Dynasty” look more like a ZZ Top tribute band than reality-TV darlings. But they’re generating the kind of ratings and social media chatter that blow away many of their prime-time counterparts.

“Duck Dynasty” is a warm and amusing saga about the Robertson family of Louisiana. It shattered A&E viewing records when it attracted 8.6 million viewers to its Season 3 opener a few weeks ago. Meanwhile, the show’s Facebook page has more than 4.2 million fans.

How did this happen? Why has a seemingly simple show about humble Southern folks who built their fortune on handmade duck calls resonated with so many people? Let us count the ways:

1. Family comes first

“Duck Dynasty” follows Duck Commander CEO Willie Robertson; his wife, Korie; his parents, Phil and Miss Kay; his brothers Jase and Jep; and Phil’s weird brother, Uncle Si. They aren’t exactly the Waltons, but they’re an affectionate, devout brood that works, plays and prays together.

2. A down-to-basics simplicity

Amid the nation’s economic downturn, “Duck Dynasty” has touched a nerve with viewers who have become turned off by the gaudy, materialistic shenanigans of the “Real Housewives,” the Kardashians, et al.

3. It transcends its genre

On one hand, “Duck Dynasty” is riding the popular wave of so-called Southern-fried “redneck” shows that includes fare such as “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo,” “Swamp Pawn” and “Buckwild.” Then again, it really belongs in a category all its own.

4. Endearing characters

“Duck Dynasty” episodes generally have a sitcom structure and, like the best scripted sitcoms, it contains a collection of interesting, diverse personalities.

5. G-rated laughs

Susan Farrell, a fan who lives in Walnut Creek, calls “Duck Dynasty” a “modern-day ‘Brady Bunch.’ ” She appreciates the show largely because it’s one that she and her husband and three kids — ages 10 through 15 — can all enjoy.

More of the story is available by clicking on the title above.

Save the Date KGHL Anniversary Party


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